Intermediate Risk In Double Marker Test

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    intermediate risk in the double marker test

    What is an intermediate risk in the double marker test

    The double marker test is a prenatal screening test that is used to assess the risk of a baby having Down syndrome, trisomy 18, or trisomy 13. The test measures two substances in the mother’s blood free beta-hCG and PAPP-A.

    An intermediate risk in the double marker test means that the baby has a slightly higher risk of having one of these chromosomal disorders than a baby with a low risk. However, it is important to remember that an intermediate risk does not mean that the baby definitely has a chromosomal disorder.

    The risk of having a baby with a chromosomal disorder increases with the mother’s age. Women who are 35 years old or older at the time of their pregnancy are more likely to have a baby with a chromosomal disorder than women who are younger.

    Other factors that can increase the risk of a chromosomal disorder include

    * Family history of a chromosomal disorder
    * Previous pregnancy with a baby with a chromosomal disorder
    * Abnormal ultrasound findings

    What does an intermediate risk in the double marker test mean for me

    If you receive an intermediate risk result from the double marker test, your doctor will likely recommend that you have further testing, such as an amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS). These tests can provide a definitive diagnosis of a chromosomal disorder.

    However, it is important to remember that these tests are invasive and carry some risks, such as miscarriage. You should discuss the risks and benefits of further testing with your doctor before making a decision.

    If I choose not to have further testing, what are my chances of having a baby with a chromosomal disorder

    The chances of having a baby with a chromosomal disorder if you have an intermediate risk result from the double marker test are about 1 in 200. This means that 95% of babies with an intermediate risk result will be born healthy.

    What can I do to reduce the risk of my baby having a chromosomal disorder

    There are a few things you can do to reduce the risk of your baby having a chromosomal disorder

    * Get pregnant before you are 35 years old.
    * Get genetic counseling if you have a family history of a chromosomal disorder.
    * Have regular prenatal care and ultrasounds.
    * Get the double marker test and other prenatal screening tests.

    If you have any concerns about your baby’s health, talk to your doctor. They can help you understand your risk and make the best decision for your pregnancy.

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    Intermediate Risk In Double Marker Test

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