What Is Adverb Clause Of Result

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    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result

    An adverb clause of result is a dependent clause that shows the result or consequence of the action in the main clause. It is introduced by a subordinating conjunction such as so that, in order that, such...that, and so...that.

    Adverb clauses of result can be used to express a variety of consequences, both positive and negative. For example:

    • Positive result: I studied hard so that I could get a good grade on the test.
    • Negative result: The weather was so bad that we had to cancel our picnic.

    Adverb clauses of result can also be used to express uncertainty or possibility. For example:

    • Uncertain result: I'm not sure if I'll be able to go to the party, but I'll try so that I can see you there.
    • Possible result: If we leave now, we might be able to beat the traffic.

    Adverb clauses of result are always dependent clauses, which means that they cannot stand alone as complete sentences. They are also introduced by subordinating conjunctions.

    To identify an adverb clause of result, look for a clause that begins with one of the following subordinating conjunctions:

    • so that
    • in order that
    • such...that
    • so...that

    The adverb clause of result will always modify the verb, adjective, or adverb in the main clause.

    Here are some examples of adverb clauses of result:

    • He studied hard so that he could get a good grade on the test.
    • The weather was so bad that we had to cancel our picnic.
    • I'm not sure if I'll be able to go to the party, but I'll try so that I can see you there.
    • If we leave now, we might be able to beat the traffic.
    • The coffee was so hot that I burned my tongue.
    • The book was so interesting that I couldn't put it down.
    • He is such a good friend that I can always count on him.
    • The problem was so difficult that it took us hours to solve it.
    • The movie was so funny that I laughed until my sides hurt.
    • The music was so loud that I couldn't hear myself think.
    • The dress was so expensive that I couldn't afford to buy it.
    • The house was so big that it had its own movie theater.

    Adverb clauses of result can be a useful tool for adding detail and interest to your writing. They can be used to explain the consequences of actions, to express uncertainty or possibility, and to create suspense.

    Here are some tips for using adverb clauses of result effectively:

    • Make sure that the adverb clause of result is clearly related to the main clause.
    • Use the correct subordinating conjunction to introduce the adverb clause of result.
    • Place the adverb clause of result at the end of the sentence for emphasis.
    • Vary the length and structure of your sentences to make your writing more interesting.
    • I studied hard so that I could get a good grade on the test.
    • The weather was so bad that we had to cancel our picnic.
    • I'm not sure if I'll be able to go to the party, but I'll try so that I can see you there.
    • If we leave now, we might be able to beat the traffic.
    • The coffee was so hot that I burned my tongue.
    • The book was so interesting that I couldn't put it down.
    • He is such a good friend that I can always count on him.
    • The problem was so difficult that it took us hours to solve it.
    • The movie was so funny that I laughed until my sides hurt.
    • The music was so loud that I couldn't hear myself think.
    • The dress was so expensive that I couldn't afford to buy it.
    • The house was so big that it had its own movie theater.

    By following these tips, you can use adverb clauses of result to improve your writing skills and make your writing more engaging for your readers.

    WebAn adverbial clause, sometimes referred to as an adverb clause, is a group of words that, together, functions as an adverb. This means that the clause describes or. WebAdverb clauses of result and concession. March 8, 2011 -. Adverb clauses of result or consequence are introduced by the subordinating conjunctions that, so…that,. WebUnit 4, Grammar. Adverb Clauses of Result. Adverb clauses of result with such---that and so---that present the result of a situation that is stated in the first clause. Adverb clauses. WebWhat is an adverb clause? An adverb clause is a group of words that is used to change or qualify the meaning of an adjective, a verb, a clause, another adverb, or any other type of.

    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result

    What is an Adverb of Place? Definition and Example Sentences - English - Source: englishgrammarhere.com
    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result

    Adverb Clause: Types of Adverbial Clauses with Useful Examples • 7ESL - Source: 7esl.com
    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result

    Examples Of Adverbial Clause Of Place : Sentence Structure - Part 4 - Source: jameshannaford.blogspot.com

    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result, Learn English Grammar: The Adverb Clause, 20.81 MB, 15:09, 945,980, Adam's English Lessons · engVid, 2017-04-04T04:26:19.000000Z, 2, What is an Adverb of Place? Definition and Example Sentences - English, 768 x 918, png, adverb clauses clause adverbs sentences adverbial grammar phrases manner englishgrammarhere adjective afs sentence contrast noun verb vocabulary gyml, 3, what-is-adverb-clause-of-result

    Learn English Grammar: The Adverb Clause

    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result. WebDalam bahasa Inggris, adverb clause terdiri dari beberapa macam. Di antaranya ialah adverb clause of time, adverb clause of condition, place, cause and.

    Do you get confused when you see long sentences with lots of commas and sections? You need to learn about clauses! Once you understand and can recognize the different types of clauses in an English sentence, everything will make sense. What is the difference between noun clauses, adjective clauses, and adverb clauses? Adverb clauses show relationships, like reason, contrast, condition, time, purpose, and comparison. In this lesson, we will look at these relationship types that make adverb clauses so important in English. I will also teach you when to use commas with adverb clauses. This will help you understand very long sentences made up of several clauses. Remember that as long as you can break down all the components of a sentence and understand the relationships between them, you can understand any sentence in English!

    Watch Adam's series on clauses:
    Dependent Clauses youtube.com/watch?v=7BsBbZqwU-c
    Noun Clauses youtube.com/watch?v=9SrEEPt4MQA
    Adjective Clauses youtube.com/watch?v=GpV39YEmh5k

    Take the quiz: engvid.com/learn-english-grammar-the-adverb-clause/

    TRANSCRIPT

    Hi. Welcome back to engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's lesson we're going to look at the adverb clause. Okay? Now, this is one of the dependent clauses that we're going to look at. I also have a lesson about noun clauses and adjective clauses. I have a lesson about the independent clause, which is different from all of these. Today we're looking at the adverb clause, which depends on the grammar book you're using. Again, they like to use different words. Some people call this the subordinate clause. "Subordinate" meaning under. Right? "Sub" means under, it's under the independent clause, means it's... The independent clause is the more important one, the subordinate clause is the second.

    Now, the thing to remember about adverb clauses: What makes them different from noun clauses or adjective clauses is that they don't modify words. Okay? A noun clause modifies or acts as a specific function to something in the independent clause. It could be the subject, it could be the object of the verb, for example. Or it could be a complement. But it's always working with some other word in the independent clause. The adjective clause-excuse me-always modifies or identifies a noun in the sentence, in the clause, etc.

    The adverb clause shows a relationship, and that's very, very important to remember because the subordinate conjunctions, the words that join the clause to the independent clause has a very specific function. The two clauses, the independent clause and the subordinate clause have a very distinct relationship. Okay? So here are some of those relationships: Reason, contrast, condition, time, purpose, and comparison. Okay? There are others, but we're going to focus on these because these are the more common ones. And there are many conjunctions, but I'm only going to give you a few here just so you have an idea how the adverb clause works. Okay?

    So, for example, when we're looking at reason... Okay? Before I give you actual sentence examples, I'm going to talk to you about the conjunctions. These are called the subordinate conjunctions. They very clearly show the relationship between the clauses, so you have to remember that. So: "because", okay? "Because" means reason. So, I did something because I had to do it. Okay? So: "I did something"-independent clause-"because"-why?-"I had to do it". I had no choice. That's the relationship between the two. "Since" can also mean "because". "Since", of course, can also mean since the beginning of something, since a time, but it can also mean "because" when we're using it as an adverb clause conjunction.

    Contrast. "Contrast" means to show that there's a difference. Now, it could be yes/no, positive/negative, but it doesn't have to be. It could be one idea and then a contrasting idea. One expectation, and one completely different result. Okay? You have to be very careful not to look for a positive or a negative verb, or a positive or negative anything else, but we're going to look at examples for that. The more common conjunctions for that is: "although" or "though"-both are okay, mean the same thing-or "whereas". Okay? "Although I am very rich, I can't afford to buy a Lamborghini." Okay? So, "rich" means lots of money. "Can't afford" means not enough money. Contrasting ideas. They're a little bit opposite from what one expects. Contrast, reason.

    Condition. "Condition" means one thing must be true for something else to be true. So, for the part of the independent clause to be true-the situation, the action, the event, whatever-then the condition must first be true. "If I were a... If I were a rich man, I would buy a Lamborghini." But I'm... Even though I am a rich man... Although I am a rich man, I can't afford one. So we use "if", "as long as". Again, there are others.

    What is an Adverb of Place? Definition and Example Sentences - English

    What Is Adverb Clause Of Result, WebWhat is an adverb clause? An adverb clause is a group of words that is used to change or qualify the meaning of an adjective, a verb, a clause, another adverb, or any other type of.

    Learn English Grammar: The Adverb Clause

    Learn English Grammar: The Adverb Clause

    Source: Youtube.com

    ADVERBIAL CLAUSES (Purpose & Result, Concession, Time, Condition, etc.)

    ADVERBIAL CLAUSES (Purpose & Result, Concession, Time, Condition, etc.)

    Source: Youtube.com


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